Buy cookbooks at http://CookbooksPlus.com
Buy cookbooks at
http://CookbooksPlus.com
member logon   about the Circus   search for recipes   print this recipe   mimi's cyber kitchen
free registration   member pages   what's new   email this recipe   discussion boards
Email to Dolce's Bee      

Recipe Categories:

    KING ARTHUR RECIPES


    Source of Recipe


    ???

    List of Ingredients




    Dumplings
    Dumplings make a soup or stew a meal and,
    with a bit more sweetening, they can be added
    to stewed fruit as well.
    Make up dough as for drop biscuits. Bring your
    soup or stew to a boil and then lower the
    temperature until it is bubbling gently. Dip a
    soup spoon or cookie scoop first into the broth,
    then scoop out some dough and place it in
    the broth. Continue until the surface is
    covered, allowing room for expansion. Cover
    and simmer until the dumplings are cooked
    through, about 15 minutes. To serve, spoon a
    couple of dumplings into a soup bowl and ladle
    the soup, stew or fruit over them.
    Scones
    Scones are really biscuits with a British
    heritage and a larger wardrobe.
    When you think of biscuits, what comes first to
    mind is the traditional baking powder biscuit.
    When you think of scones, the tendency is to
    ask "what kind?" The basic recipe is
    essentially the same, although in general, we
    think of biscuits as savory and scones as
    sweet. And scones, more frequently
    than not, contain additional ingredients that
    give them a specific character.
    Here's how to make them with our mix.
    First preheat your oven to 450F. Scones tend
    to be a little larger than biscuits. You'll make
    about 4 scones per 1 cups of mix. To each cup
    of mix, add any combination of Defining
    Ingredients before adding 1/4 cup water.
    Add some Defining Ingredients*. Each is to be
    added to 1 cup of mix. Use
    these alone or in combination. Add 1/4 cup
    water per cup of mix used.

    Defining Ingredients*
    (amount given is per cup of mix)
    Sweet Scones
    raditional British scones contain currants or
    raisins. American versions often include fresh
    fruit such as blueberries, chopped cranberries,
    apples or peaches. Use about 1/4 cup per cup
    of mix.
    Add one teaspoon of your favorite spice, either
    alone or in combination.

    -- For crunch, add 1/2 cup nuts or sunflower or
    pumpkin seeds.

    zest, add 1/2 teaspoon grated lemon or orange
    peel (or 3 or 4 drops
    lemon or orange oil added to water rather than
    dry mix).

    - This one will be a travesty to traditionalists
    but will put a gleam in the eye of those with a
    sweet tooth; add 1/3 teaspoon vanilla, 1
    tablespoon sugar and 1/3 cup chocolate chips.
    With some additional pecans or walnuts, this is
    a special treat for a special person's teatime.
    Savory Scones
    Any of these, alone or in combination, are good
    additions to a cup of mix for
    either scones, biscuits or dumplings.
    1/3 cup grated cheese
    1 teaspoon fresh herbs (or 1/3 teaspoon dried)
    1/4 cup chopped bacon or other cured meat
    Mixing, Cutting and Baking

    Put the scones together the way you would
    biscuits, adding any "defining ingredients" to
    the dry ingredients before you add the wet.
    Mix, knead, and roll as you would biscuits.
    Scones are traditionally cut into wedges,
    which avoids the waste issue. Place them on a
    lightly floured baking sheet (or pizza pan) and
    bake for about 15 minutes.
    Muffins
    Muffins are generally wetter and sweeter than
    biscuits or scones, so will require a few more
    additions to our mix. But this is as complicated
    as we'll get. Much more than this and the
    advantages of a mix are lost. In this case
    the extra time spent in adding ingredients (in
    the cosmic sense, this may not
    be much of an issue!) is balanced by not having
    to "knead, roll, and cut."
    Two cups of mix will make a dozen small to
    medium muffins.
    2 cups baking mix
    1/3 cup sugar (about 3 tablespoons per cup of
    mix)
    1 egg
    1 cup water
    Get some ideas from "Defining Ingredients"
    under Scones for ways to dress up
    your muffins.
    Preheat your oven to 450F.
    Put the mix in a mixing bowl. Blend in the
    sugar. At this point add any dry "Defining
    Ingredients." Beat the egg with the water and
    stir gently into the mix, taking only 20
    seconds. This is important. No matter how
    lumpy, resist
    the temptation to stir until the lumps are gone.
    You'll wind up with tennis balls if you don't.
    Using a 1/3 cup measure or a cookie scoop, fill
    the cups of a muffin tin 1/2 to 2/3 full. Bake at
    450F for about 15 minutes.
    To save even more time, mix up the batter and
    pour it into a greased 8-inch cake pan and bake
    for about 20 minutes at 450F.
    A Scrumptious Coffeecake
    This takes the muffin-in-the-cake-pan concept
    one step further. For this you'll need a tube
    pan.
    Topping
    1 cup pecans or walnuts, chopped or ground
    1/2 cup packed brown sugar
    2 teaspoons cinnamon
    This is made first since some of it is
    incorporated into the cake itself. If
    you have a blender or coffee grinder, this can
    be done very quickly. After
    the nuts are ground, mix with the brown sugar
    and spice (you can even make
    some of this mixture ahead, and refrigerate it
    for future use).
    Batter
    3 cups baking mix
    1/2 cup sugar
    1 1/3 cups water
    2 eggs*
    *In this recipe, we're using 3 cups of mix
    which, according to the muffin
    recipe, would necessitate using 1 1/2 eggs.
    Half of a large egg is a little less than 2
    tablespoons of liquid (it takes 5 large or 4 extra
    large eggs to make a cup). Since it's tough to
    halve a raw egg, we'll use 2 eggs and
    subtract about 2 tablespoons from the water
    measurement. You can go the other
    way as well and use 1 egg and increase the
    water measurement by a couple of
    tablespoons. Or, if you are concerned about
    yolks and cholesterol, use a total of 3 egg
    whites and toss the yolks.
    Egg yolks do have their share of cholesterol.
    But since the greater culprit that makes our
    bodies create too much cholesterol (we do need
    some) is consumption of saturated fat rather
    than cholesterol itself, eggs look a
    little better nutritionally. The yolk of an egg
    contains a bit more than 5 1/2 grams of fat.
    Less than 2 of those are saturated. Most of the
    rest is monounsaturated. When you bake with
    eggs, you use one or two per cake. The
    amount you eat in one serving is probably not
    cause for alarm.

    In spite of their bad reputation because of
    cholesterol, eggs contain a lot of nutrition in a
    very small, low-calorie package. The protein in
    eggs is complete, and eggs can complete the
    partial protein in grains when the two
    are eaten together. They also perform a great
    magic in baking. Egg yolks, which contain
    most of the nutrients (as well as the
    cholesterol), make baked products richer and
    more tender. The protein in egg whites creates
    structure
    in baked goods, just as gluten does.
    Preheat your oven to 350F.

    Put the batter together as described for
    Muffins. Grease the bottom and sides
    of the tube pan. Put about 1/2 the batter in the
    bottom. Sprinkle 1/3 of the > topping over this
    and swirl it in gently with a fork. Put the
    remaining batter on top and sprinkle on another
    1/3 of the topping.
    Bake for 25 to 30 minutes. Let the coffeecake
    cool for about ten minutes after it has baked.
    Turn it out onto a serving platter, sprinkle on
    the remaining topping and serve.
    Pancakes
    1 egg
    1 to 1 1/4 cups water (depending on how thick
    or thin you like your pancakes)
    2 cups baking mix (spooned lightly into a
    measuring cup)
    In a mixing bowl, beat the egg and water
    together until the mixture is light.
    Stir in the mix until it is just moistened; about
    20 seconds of blending will do it. Don't try to
    get out all the lumps. By the time you've
    succeeded in > obliterating them, you will have
    activated the gluten enough to make the
    pancakes tough and rubbery. Any lumps won't
    be perceptible in the pancakes themselves.
    To cook pancakes most successfully, use a
    griddle that heats and holds the
    heat evenly. Cast iron is particularly good for
    this. Preheat your griddle ("spider") and grease
    it lightly. Since cast iron needs to be seasoned
    on an ongoing basis, it's best to use a light film
    of vegetable oil, shortening or
    even butter for the first batch. (If you use a
    baking spray , make sure it is comprised
    mainly of a fat rather than lecithin, which tends
    to gum up the surface.) If your griddle is well
    seasoned, you may not need to use any
    grease at all. Just remember to wipe the
    surface of the griddle off after you've finished
    cooking, and if it appears dry, wipe it again
    with a bit of oil before you put it away. This
    keeps the seasoning intact and keeps air
    from the surface, which can oxidize it (make it
    rusty.) When the griddle is the right
    temperature, a few drops of water will "dance"
    on the surface. Use a 1/4-cup measure, or a
    large cookie or ice cream scoop,
    and pour batter onto the griddle, leaving room
    for expansion. Turn the pancakes when a few
    of the bubbles that appear on the surface don't
    fill in.
    The second side will cook in about half the
    time the first side takes.

    Waffles
    The pancake recipe can also be used to make
    waffles. If your waffle iron is not nonstick (and
    often even if it is) you'll need to apply a thin
    film of grease before you pour on the batter.
    This can be done easily with a pastry
    brush (or use a nonstick vegetable spray).
    Unlike a griddle, a waffle iron
    needs greasing before each waffle is baked to
    prevent sticking (a grim prospect for those of
    you who have had the pleasure of removing a
    waffle that has bonded to the iron).
    Although waffle irons differ, a waffle usually
    cooks in 2 to 4 minutes. When steam stops
    pouring out from under the lid, check to see if
    it's done. If the top doesn't want to lift up, it
    probably needs another minute or two. A
    well-seasoned iron will "let go" of the waffle
    when it's done.
    Waffles are best eaten right from the iron if you
    like them crisp. They tend to soften if you
    stockpile them like pancakes.
    Variations for Pancakes and Waffles
    Here's how to dress up the basic mix, for
    variety, or to celebrate the season.
    - To make extra-light pancakes or waffles,
    separate the egg(s), beat only the yolk(s) into
    the liquid ingredients, beat the white(s) until
    you have stiff peaks and fold in last.
    - Sprinkle cinnamon on the pancake before you
    flip it over (or on the waffle before you close
    the lid of the iron).
    Add 1 teaspoon cinnamon (per cup of mix)
    directly to the mix.
    -- Fold in 1/2 cup (per cup of mix) mashed or
    chopped banana, berries or
    other fruit.s. By the time you've succeeded in
    obliterating them, you will have activated the
    gluten enough to make the pancakes tough and
    rubbery. Any lumps won't be perceptible in the
    pancakes themselves.
    To cook pancakes most successfully, use a
    griddle that heats and holds the
    heat evenly. Cast iron is particularly good for
    this. Preheat your griddle ("spider") and grease
    it lightly. Since cast iron needs to be seasoned
    on an ongoing basis, it's best to use a light film
    of vegetable oil, shortening or even butter for
    the first batch. (If you use a baking spray ,
    make sure it is comprised mainly of a fat rather
    than lecithin, which tends to gum up the
    surface.) If your griddle is well seasoned, you
    may not need to use any grease at all. Just
    remember to wipe the surface of the griddle off
    after you've finished cooking, and if it appears
    dry, wipe it again with a bit of oil before you
    put it away. This keeps the seasoning intact
    and keeps air from the surface, which can
    oxidize it (make it rusty.)
    When the griddle is the right temperature, a
    few drops of water will "dance" on the surface.
    Use a 1/4-cup measure, or a large cookie or ice
    cream scoop, and pour batter onto the griddle,
    leaving room for expansion. Turn the
    pancakes when a few of the bubbles that
    appear on the surface don't fill in.
    The second side will cook in about half the
    time the first side takes.
    Waffles
    The pancake recipe can also be used to make
    waffles. If your waffle iron is't nonstick (and
    often even if it is) you'll need to apply a thin
    film of grease before you pour on the batter.
    This can be done easily with a pastry
    brush (or use a nonstick vegetable spray).
    Unlike a griddle, a waffle iron needs greasing
    before each waffle is baked to prevent sticking
    (a grim prospect for those of you who have had
    the pleasure of removing a waffle that has
    bonded to the iron).
    Although waffle irons differ, a waffle usually
    cooks in 2 to 4 minutes. When steam stops
    pouring out from under the lid, check to see if
    it's done. If the top doesn't want to lift up, it
    probably needs another minute or two. A
    well-seasoned iron will "let go" of the waffle
    when it's done.
    Waffles are best eaten right from the iron if you
    like them crisp. They tend to soften if you
    stockpile them like pancakes.
    Variations for Pancakes and Waffles
    Here's how to dress up the basic mix, for
    variety, or to celebrate the season.
    To make extra-light pancakes or waffles,
    separate the egg(s), beat only the yolk(s) into
    the liquid ingredients, beat the white(s) until
    you have stiff peaks and fold in last.
    -- Sprinkle cinnamon on the pancake before you
    flip it over (or on the waffle before you close
    the lid of the iron).
    Add 1 teaspoon cinnamon (per cup of mix)
    directly to the mix.
    - Fold in 1/2 cup (per cup of mix) mashed or
    chopped banana, berries or
    other fruit.
    This recipe reprinted from King Arthur Flour's
    Baking Sheet, Vol. III, No. 4,
    March-April 1992.

    Recipe




 

 

 


previous page | recipe circus home page | member pages
mimi's cyber kitchen |